Road rules and traffic offences

08 Sep 2016 - 11:12 | Version 12 |

Contributed by AlisonCrouch and current to 1 May 2016

There are many laws governing how a person should behave when in control of a motor vehicle, motor cycle, bicycle, powered cycles or wheeled recreational device, such as a skateboard or rollerblades, on the road.

Most traffic laws are found in the Traffic Act (TA) and accompanying Traffic Regulations (TAR). The Australian Road Rules (ARR) can be found in Schedule 3 of TAR. The TA and TAR can be accessed and downloaded at the NT Government website: www.nt.gov.au, by following the links. Alternatively, copies of the ARR are available at Motor Vehicle Registry (MVR) branches at no cost (see Contact points).

For most traffic offences, such as speeding or failing to wear a seatbelt, an offender will receive a Traffic Infringement Notice (TIN) and will not be required to attend court. However, more serious traffic offences, such as driving without due care, driving without a licence and driving an unregistered vehicle, must be dealt with by a court. While the majority of these offences will generally attract a fine, very serious offences, such as driving while intoxicated or causing death or injury by reckless or dangerous driving, may incur a jail sentence or disqualify an offender from holding a driver's licence for a certain period of time.

This chapter focuses on the traffic offences that require court attendance. Further information on road rules and traffic offences can be found in the Northern Territory Road Users Handbook by clicking here.

Offences

Dangerous driving offences

Murder and manslaughter

A person who kills someone accidentally or intentionally through the use of a motor vehicle can be charged with manslaughter or murder [CCA ss156, 160] (see Offences against the person ).

Driving motor vehicle causing death or serious harm

A person who drives a motor vehicle dangerously, at a dangerous speed or while under the influence of alcohol or drugs is guilty of an offence under this section if they cause death or serious harm to any person [CCA s174F]. The maximum penalty for an offence where death is caused is 10 years imprisonment. If serious harm is caused the maximum penalty is seven years imprisonment.

Dangerous driving

A driver can be charged with dangerous driving if caught driving in a reckless or negligent manner that is seen to be a danger to the public [TA s30].

A driver can be charged with this offence even though no actual harm has come to any member of the public. In assessing whether a person's driving was dangerous, a court takes into account the time of day, the condition of the road, whether other vehicles were on the road, whether the driver had been drinking, and the age and condition of the vehicle.

The maximum penalty for driving in a dangerous manner is a fine of 20 penalty units or two years imprisonment. If a court finds a person guilty, it is required, without exception, to cancel their licence for a minimum of six months for the first offence and for at least 12 months for any subsequent offence.
How much is too much?

One standard drink increases the blood alcohol concentration of the average woman by 0.03gms per 100ml blood. To stay below 0.05 a woman should have no more than one standard drink per hour.

One standard drink increases the blood alcohol concentration of the average man by 0.02gms per 100ml blood. To stay below 0.05 a man should have no more than two standard drinks in the first hour of drinking and then no more than one standard drink per hour after that.

Any amount of alcohol impairs driving performance. A guide to how many standard drinks are contained in a range of different alcoholic beverages can be found on the Department of Health's website by the links or by clicking here.

Road rage

Following another vehicle at a very close distance (commonly called tailgating), verbally abusing or obscenely gesturing at another driver, or pursuing another driver are examples of what is commonly referred to as road rage. It is treated the same way as driving dangerously (see above), that is, very seriously, because it is seen as a danger to the public. A driver who is pursued by another driver in a threatening manner should immediately drive to the nearest police station.

Careless driving or riding

The least serious of the dangerous driving offences is driving without due care. This offence can also apply to bicycle riders. A person is usually charged with driving without due care when they ignore acceptable driving standards or drive without reasonable consideration for others [TAR reg18]. A person charged with driving in a dangerous manner is often charged with driving without due care, though police usually proceed with only one of the charges. There is no mandatory licence disqualification. A person caught driving without due care can be issued an on the spot fine of $150.

Drink and drug driving offences

NT courts treat drink and drug driving offences very seriously. Under the 'drink and drug driving' legislation, a person who pleads guilty or is found guilty of driving with a blood alcohol content over the legal limit or with drugs in their blood will lose their driver's licence for a specified period. The only exception to this for a first offence of low range blood alcohol content (a reading between 0.05% - 0.08%) which does not carry an automatic mandatory minimum disqualification [TA s23(4)(a) and (b)]. Apart from this single exception, a magistrate has no discretion in relation to licence disqualification. It is irrelevant that, by losing their licence, an offender will lose their job, their business or face some other unpleasant consequences. There are no special licences and no exceptions for driving for work purposes or the like. While a first offence may only result in a fine and licence disqualification, the penalties for subsequent offences are more severe. A person charged with a third drink driving offence may to be sentenced to a period of imprisonment. A prior drink driving offence committed in another state does not result in a further drink driving offence against the TA being a second or subsequent offence.

The major offences involving the combination of alcohol, drugs and driving created by the TA are as follows:
  • Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs (DUI)
  • Low range: Exceed 0.05% but under 0.08% blood alcohol content
  • Medium range: Exceed 0.08% but under 0.150% blood alcohol content
  • High range: Exceed 0.150% blood alcohol content
  • Zero blood alcohol
  • Drug driving
  • Offences relating to breath, saliva and blood tests

Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs

A person who drives, attempts to drive, attempts to put a vehicle in motion or is a driving instructor occupying a passenger seat for the purpose of instructing another person, while under the influence of alcohol or a drug to the extent that it meant that they are incapable of having proper control of the vehicle is guilty of an offence [TA s29AAA]. This offence carries with it a maximum penalty of 10 penalty units or 12 months imprisonment for a first offence and 20 penalty units or 12 months imprisonment for a subsequent offence. Mandatory licence disqualification periods apply.

Simply putting the keys into the vehicle's ignition or otherwise attempting to start the engine can constitute driving. The definition of drugs for this purpose includes legal medications that make a driver disorientated or drowsy. A driver should always check the labels on prescriptions and medications to inform themselves about possible side effects.

The offence of driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs (DUI) is not the same as driving with a blood alcohol level in excess of 50mg of alcohol per 100mls of blood (see Exceeding 0.05 and 0.08 ) because a driver may be 'below the limit' but still incapable of exercising effective control of a vehicle. Driving requires some degree of skill and coordination and, for the purposes of this offence, a person will be found guilty if there are signs that any of their physical or mental faculties are impaired.

To prove a charge of DUI, the prosecution need to provide evidence of the accused's state and manner of driving. Evidence that the vehicle was moving erratically or failing to stay in one lane, that the driver smelled of liquor, was unsteady on their feet or slurring their words, or had bloodshot eyes may persuade a court that they were too intoxicated or affected by drugs to be driving. If a driver tells police how much alcohol they have consumed, the prosecution will repeat this information in court. The prosecution find the low range drink driving offence (exceeding 0.05) easier to prove, so are likely to use this charge wherever possible and in preference to DUI.

Low range: 0.05% but under 0.08%

This is the only category of drink driving offence which can be dealt with by a traffic infringement notice. If police issue you with one of these, you can pay the fine and avoid going to court or losing your licence. This charge does not usually go to court unless you are also charged with other offences or you have received a traffic infringement notice for drink driving within the last three years. If it does go to court the following penalties apply:
  • First offence:

    • Maximum penalty of 5 penalty units and/or imprisonment for 3months; and
      Licence disqualification not compulsory.

  • Second or subsequent offence:
    • Maximum penalty of 7.5 penalty units and/or imprisonment for 6 months; and
    • For a second offence compulsory licence disqualification for a minimum period of 3 months; or
    • For a third or subsequent offence, compulsory licence disqualification for a minimum period of 6 months.

Medium range: 0.08% but under 0.150%

  • First offence:
    • Maximum penalty of 7.5 penalty units and/or imprisonment for 6 months; and
    • Compulsory licence disqualification for a minimum period of 6 months.
  • Second or subsequent offence:
    • Maximum penalty of 20 penalty units and/or imprisonment for 12 months; and
    • Compulsory licence disqualification for a mandatory period that is at least 12 months; and
    • If the mandatory period is less than 5 years, the offender must be subject to an Alcohol Ignition Lock (AIL) period of between 12 months and 3 years immediately after the mandatory licence disqualification period is served (see Alcohol Ignition Locks ).

High range: 0.15% and over

  • First offence:
    • Maximum penalty of 10 penalty units and/or imprisonment for 12 months; and
    • Compulsory licence disqualification for a minimum period of 12 months.
  • Second or subsequent offence:
    • Maximum penalty of 20 penalty units and/or imprisonment for 12 months; and
    • Compulsory licence disqualification for a mandatory period that is at least 18 months; and
    • If the mandatory period is less than 5 years, the offender must be subject to an Alcohol Ignition Lock (AIL) period of between 12 months and 3 years immediately after the mandatory licence disqualification period is served (see Alcohol Ignition Locks ).

Drug driving

There are two categories of prohibited drugs. The first are drugs that are prohibited completely, which includes illegal drugs such as cannabis, methyl amphetamines, ecstasy, heroin and cocaine. The second category are drugs that are prohibited, unless you can show that you took the drug as directed by your doctor. Examples of these types of drugs are morphine and methadone.

The police do not need to prove that your ability to drive was impaired to prove this offence. Police may deal with a first drug offence by issuing a traffic infringement notice, in which case you can pay a fine and avoid going to court or losing your licence.

If you do go to court, the following penalties apply:
  • First offence:

    • Maximum penalty of 5 penalty units and/or imprisonment for 3months; and

    • Licence disqualification not compulsory.

  • Second or subsequent offence:
    • Maximum penalty of 7.5 penalty units and/or imprisonment for 6 months; and
    • For a second offence compulsory licence disqualification for a minimum period of 3 months; or
    • For a third or subsequent offence, compulsory licence disqualification for a minimum period of 6 months.

Zero blood alcohol

The law in the NT requires that drivers in these categories must not have any alcohol in their blood when driving:
  • Anyone under 18 years old
  • Learner licence (L plate) holders
  • Provisional licence (P plate) holders
  • Unlicensed drivers (except through failure to renew licence)
  • Anyone under 25 who has not held a licence continuously for three years
  • A 'trade-related driver', meaning:
    • A professional driving instructor who is instructing someone to drive
    • A driver of a vehicle that has a GVM of more than 15 tonnes
    • A driver of a vehicle carrying dangerous goods
    • A driver of a commercial passenger vehicle
    • A driver of a vehicle capable of seating more than 12 persons (including the driver)
    • A driver of a vehicle carrying more than 12 persons
    • A driver of a vehicle that has a space designed to carry goods, when a person is travelling in that space.
The penalties for failing to have zero blood alcohol are as follows:

Type of driver/Penalty 1st offence
Max. fine and/or jail
1st offence
Min. disqualification period
2nd or subsequent offence
Max. fine and/or jail
2nd offence
Min. disqualification period
3rd + offence
Min. disqualification period
L & P plater, under 18 & unlicensed drivers 5 penalty units/3 months 3 months 7.5 penalty units/6 months

Min. 6 months + 6 months AIL period* (if no AIL - total of min. 12 months)
Same as second offence
Trade-related drivers 5 penalty units/3 months Discretionary 7.5 penalty units/6 months

Min. 3 months + 6 months AIL period (if no AIL - total of min. 9 months)

Min. 6 months + 6 month AIL period (if no AIL total of min. 12 months)
Driving instructors 5 penalty units/3 months Discretionary 7.5 penalty units/6 months

Min 3 months
Min. 6 months
*See below for more information on AIL - Alcohol Ignition Lock licenses.

Usually, a breath test and breath analysis are used to determine a person's blood alcohol concentration. A breath test is first used to screen anyone above the legal limit, which is 0.05. The test determines whether alcohol is present in a driver's blood and whether it is an amount over the legal limit. A person who registers a blood alcohol concentration above the legal limit is then given a breath analysis, which gives a more accurate reading of blood alcohol content. A driver who takes a breath analysis and registers a blood alcohol concentration above the legal limit can request a second blow of the machine. If the result is below the limit, the person is released; if it is above the legal limit, the person is charged.

Drinking after driving

Police do not have to actually catch an intoxicated driver in the act. A breath test can be conducted up to four hours after a person has stopped driving. A blood test can be conducted at a hospital up to four hours after driving. Any alcohol detected is presumed to have been present for the four hours immediately preceding the test.

Breath tests

The police have the power to require a person to undergo a roadside breath test in certain circumstances. One of these circumstances is whether a person is directed to pull over for a random breath test. Another is when police have a reasonable suspicion that a driver has committed a drink or drug driving offence. If a driver refuses to submit to a breath test, or fails to provide a sufficient sample of breath for the purposes of the breath test, they can be arrested for the purposes of a breath analysis [TA s29AAC(4)].

Breath analysis

A driver who has taken a breath test and recorded a blood alcohol concentration above the legal limit is required to submit to a breath analysis. A police officer can require a person to undergo a random breath analysis irrespective of whether or not they have grounds for suspecting that a person has consumed alcohol or if they have a reasonable suspicion that the person has committed drink or drug driving offence or was involved in a crash [TA s29AAC(1)(a) and (c)].

A driver who refuses to take a breath analysis can be arrested. Refusing a breath analysis or failing to supply a sufficient sample of breath for a breath analysis is a serious offence and attracts the following penalties:
  • First offence:
    • Maximum penalty of 10 penalty units and/or imprisonment for 12 months
    • Compulsory licence disqualification for a minimum period of 12 months.
  • Second or subsequent offence:
    • Maximum penalty of 20 penalty units and/or imprisonment for 12 months
    • Compulsory licence disqualification for a mandatory period that is at least 18 months
    • If the mandatory period is less than 5 years, the offender must be subject to an Alcohol Ignition Lock (AIL) period of between 12 months and 3 years immediately after the mandatory licence disqualification period is served (see Alcohol Ignition Locks ).
A person is allowed to refuse a breath analysis if it would be detrimental to their health or if they have a physical disability that prevents them from providing a sufficient sample of breath [TA s29AAC(6)]. Courts treat the requirement to undertake a breath analysis very seriously and any excuse must be supported by sound medical evidence of the condition. For instance, a serious lung disorder would excuse a person from a test, but a chest cold would not. Where police believe that a person's medical condition justifies their refusal to take a breath analysis, they can request them to provide a blood sample instead [TA s25(2)].

Blood tests

Blood tests provide a more accurate result than a breath analysis. The police may require a driver to provide a sample of blood for the purpose of analysis [TA s29AAG].

If a driver is required by the police to provide a sample of blood and they refuse to provide the sample, the following penalties apply:
  • First offence:
    • Maximum penalty of 10 penalty units and/or imprisonment for 12 months
    • Compulsory licence disqualification for a minimum period of 12 months.
  • Second or subsequent offence:
    • Maximum penalty of 20 penalty units and/or imprisonment for 12 months
    • Compulsory licence disqualification for a mandatory period that is at least 18 months
    • If the mandatory period is less than 5 years, the offender must be subject to an Alcohol Ignition Lock (AIL) period of between 12 months and 3 years immediately after the mandatory licence disqualification period is served (see Alcohol Ignition Locks ).

A driver who has been taken into custody may ask the police to arrange for them to speak to a medical practitioner for the purpose of them taking a sample of their blood. If the request is made, a police officer must make arrangements for them to speak with a medical practitioner [TA s29AAL].

Saliva tests

The police may require that a driver provide sample of their saliva (a saliva test) to see if there are any drugs in the driver's body. The police have the power to do this when they pull a driver over randomly, of if they suspect the driver is under the influence of alcohol or drugs or if they suspect the driver was in a car crash [TA s29AAF]. If a driver fails to provide the police with a sample of their saliva, the following penalties apply:

  • First offence:
    • Maximum penalty of 5 penalty units and/or imprisonment for 3 months
    • Licence disqualification not compulsory
  • Second or subsequent offence:
    • Maximum penalty of 7.5 penalty units and/or imprisonment for 6 months
    • For a second offence compulsory licence disqualification for a minimum period of 3 months
    • For a third or subsequent offence, compulsory licence disqualification for a minimum period of 6 months.

Alcohol Ignition Lock (AIL) licences

An AIL is a breath testing device and prevents the vehicle being started if the driver has been drinking.

The law in the NT provides that for certain second or subsequent drink or drug driving offences, drivers must be disqualified for a "mandatory period". If that mandatory period is less than 5 years, the driver may be subject to an Alcohol Ignition Lock (AIL) period that is between 6 months and 3 years. This means that after the driver has completed the mandatory period they can apply to have an AIL licence, which permits the driver to drive vehicles that have the AIL installed in their vehicle. They must not drive any vehicle without an AIL installed, and it is a criminal offence to do so. AIL's are quite expensive which precludes many people from being able to have them installed. If a driver elects not to apply for an AIL licence they must serve the entirety of the disqualification period, not just the mandatory period.

Driver Education Programs

Offenders who are disqualified from driving by the court must not only wait until their licence disqualification period has expired before reapplying for their licence, they must also attend a driver education course.

Other offences

Driving while disqualified or suspended

If a person is charged with a drink or drug driving offence or another offence that could result in licence disqualification, a police officer can after charging the person, but before the charge is determined in court, give them a notice informing them that they are disqualified from driving until such time as the charge is determined [TA s29AAN]. If the suspended driver drives during this period, they are caught by the provisions for disqualified drivers set out below.

Importantly, in Assan v Meredith [2007] NTSC 12 it was emphasised that there are certain procedures the police must follow in order to disqualify a driver. The police must physically give the driver a copy of the charge sheet and then physically give the driver notice of disqualification if the driver is to be disqualified.

A person who drives while disqualified by a court from holding or obtaining a driver's licence is guilty of an offence [TA s31] and liable for a maximum penalty of imprisonment for 12 months. The court can also extend an offender's disqualification period for as long as it thinks fit. Driving a motor vehicle while disqualified is a serious misdemeanour. The offence amounts to a breach of a court order and a jail sentence is likely to be imposed. The combination of driving whilst disqualified and drink or drug driving is treated even more seriously.

Driving unlicensed

Driving a motor vehicle without a current licence, while less serious than driving while disqualified, is still an offence [TA s32]. An interstate or overseas visitor driving in the NT is not guilty of an offence if they have a valid interstate or overseas licence. Any person who becomes resident in the NT must obtain a NT driver's licence. A person is considered to be a resident if they have lived in the NT continuously for three months.

Driving unregistered

A motor vehicle must be registered and carry third party insurance to be driven in a public place or on a public street [TA s33] (see Motor vehicle accidents ). Third party personal insurance is paid as part of the registration fee. A person who drives an unregistered vehicle is probably uninsured as well (see Driving an uninsured motor vehicle ). A person can even be found guilty of this offence if the unregistered vehicle they were driving was not theirs and they didn't know it was unregistered or uninsured.

A vehicle registered interstate can be driven in the NT but is required to be registered in the NT within 28 days of arriving. The maximum penalty for driving an unregistered vehicle is 20 penalty units or imprisonment for 12 months.

The court may reduce a penalty if it can be persuaded that the driver was not at fault.

Driving an uninsured motor vehicle

Motor vehicles must carry third party insurance. Failure to insure a vehicle is an offence [TA s34] that carries a minimum fine for a first offence, namely 5 penalty units, and minimum fine for a second or subsequent offence, namely 10 penalty units. The mandatory minimum fine does not apply if the offence occurs not more than one month after the registration of the vehicle last expired.

Unlawful use of a motor vehicle

Using another person's motor vehicle unlawfully without their permission is an offence [CCA s218] that carries a maximum penalty of two years imprisonment regardless of whether the offender is the driver or a passenger. If the vehicle is involved in an accident and suffers more than $1000 worth of damage or the offender causes danger or injury to a person, or the value of the vehicle is more than $20,000 the maximum penalty is seven years imprisonment.

Failing to remain at an accident scene or to report an accident

A person involved in a motor vehicle accident must remain at the scene of the accident for sufficient time as to allow other drivers involved to make necessary enquiries, such as exchanging names and addresses, and to render all possible assistance. The person must also report the accident to the police within 24 hours. Failure to do so is an offence [TAR reg19] punishable by a maximum penalty of 20 penalty units or imprisonment for six months.

Drag racing and burnouts

Unauthorised speed trials or races between vehicles are prohibited on roads or in public places [TAR reg37]. A person taking part in such an event is subject to a fine of 5 penalty units and a person organising such an event can be fined 10 penalty units. A spectator can even be penalised 1 penalty unit for simply attending such an event. Burnouts and other damage to roads caused by motor vehicle attract a fine of 5 penalty units for each offence.

Habitual offenders

Special rules apply to drivers who have been caught doing burnouts, damaging roads or taking part in road races/speed trials [TA Div. VA;. TAR reg91A]. If a driver has committed two such offences within a two year period then the car used to commit the last offence may be impounded for 48 hours. If the driver commits a third offence his car may be impounded for as long as three months. For a fourth offence the driver may have to forfeit his vehicle to the NT Government.

If the vehicle involved in an offence was stolen, used unlawfully or a rental car, it cannot be impounded or forfeited. Also, a vehicle cannot be impounded or forfeited if it would cause financial or physical hardship to the owner or usual user. If a vehicle is impounded, the owner of the vehicle will be responsible for any costs associated with the impounding.

Mobile phones and driving

The driver of a vehicle can make or receive a phone call on a mobile phone if the phone is either secured in a mounting fixed to the vehicle or remotely operated. All other functions (including video calls, texting and emailing) are prohibited while the vehicle is moving, or stationary but not parked, for example, stopped at a traffic light [ARR r300]. There must be no touching of the keypad unless the phone is fixed to the vehicle. The driver may touch the ear piece or headset to operate the phone or pass it to a passenger.

The penalty for using a mobile phone whilst driving is a fine of $250 and 3 demerit points.

Failing to supply information

A driver in a vehicle pulled over by police should, if requested, produce their licence and personal particulars (name and residential address). Police can require this information from a person who has committed a traffic offence or they believe has committed an offence [TAR reg9]. The maximum penalty for failing to supply information or supplying false and misleading information is 20 penalty units or imprisonment for six months.

Arrest and bail

Police have the right to arrest a person for breaking the law (see Investigation and arrest ). However, most traffic cases are not serious and do not involve arrest. Nevertheless, it is important to remember that police have the discretion to arrest and resisting arrest is a serious offence (see Offences against public order ). Police usually only arrest a person in relation to a traffic offence if there is some doubt about their address or identity or if they have caused trouble by, for example, refusing a breath test, or if they are drunk.

Police are entitled to hold an intoxicated person in custody.

Minor traffic infringements

Minor traffic offences, which are offences that carry no possibility of imprisonment, can either be dealt with by court proceedings or, if the offender has been issued with a Traffic Infringement Notice (TIN), by paying the fine.

Traffic Infringement Notices

Most offences against the TA result in motorists being issued with a TIN. In the NT, red light cameras and speed cameras are set up at random. These cameras photograph vehicles running red lights and those that exceed the sign-posted limit. The speed of speeding vehicles is also recorded. A TIN, along with the photograph of the vehicle and details about the time, date and location of the offence, and if relevant, the speed the vehicle was doing, are sent to the registered owner of the vehicle. It is irrelevant who was driving at the time.

In other cases, an offender is stopped by a police officer, who states how the law has been broken and gives the offender the TIN. The TIN states the offence and the fine to be paid. A TIN can also be sent by post or attached to an offender's vehicle.

Driver other than the owner

If an owner was not driving at the time of an infringement, most of the time the problem can be solved if the owner asks the person who was driving to pay the fine. If they don't ask or the driver won't pay the owner will have to complete a Notice of Objection Form printed on the back of the TIN, thereby electing to have the matter dealt with by a court. The owner also has to sign the statutory declaration supplied with the TIN, giving details of who was driving and how they came to be driving the car. This has to be forwarded to the police, who will investigate the matter; it is the police who take the matter and any evidence they find before the court.

It is important to note that most businesses that provide employees with work vehicles normally require an offending employee to pay any TIN they incur while driving.

Late payment

Under the Traffic Infringement Notice Enforcement Scheme (TINES), a motorist who fails to pay their fine within 28 days is sent a courtesy letter which advises them that they must pay the fine plus a late fee within 28 days or elect to have the matter dealt with in the Local Court.

If a person cannot afford to pay they should contact the Fines Recovery Unit immediately (see Contact points). A motorist who does nothing after receiving the letter can be ordered to pay the fine plus costs. If the motorist ignores this order for a further 28 days, a Penalty Enforcement Order under the Fines and Penalties (Recovery) Act (FAPRA) is issued. Should the fine remain unpaid, the Fines Recovery Unit (FRU) can request that MVR suspend the offenders driver's licence. If there is no licence to suspend, then registration of all vehicles owned by the offender are suspended [FAPRA ss60,61]. If a fine still remains unpaid after three months, then civil action such as an order for the seizure of property may be made [FAPRA s70]. There are provisions under FAPRA for an offender to apply for an extension of time in which to pay the fine or to pay by instalments [FAPRA s.26]. For further information contact the FRU on 1800 111 530 or visit their website at www.fru.nt.gov.au.

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